RePEc in August 2013

September 4, 2013

Over the past month, we welcomed the following new archive participants: African Governance and Development Institute, Universität Bern (II), Universitatea Creştină “Dimitrie Cantemir” (II), American Enterprise Institute, OSINERGMIN (Peru), Central Bank of Montenegro, University of Tokyo (II), Better Advances Press, Université Libre de Bruxelles (II). With the addition of Cameroun and Montenegro, this brings the number of countries hosting RePEc archives to 78. We also counted 1,806,601 abstract views and 437,187 downloads from those RePEc services participating in our statistics.

Finally, the following thresholds where passed last month:
30000000 cumulative articles downloads
1300000 items available online
800000 articles available online
500000 articles with abstracts
200000 articles with extracted references
5000 cited books
3000 software components available online
20% of registered authors indexed in RePEc Genealogy


A proposed RePEc fantasy league

August 22, 2013

Back on the 1st of April (Fool’s Day) of this year, I introduced the RePEc fantasy league. While this post was to be more on the humorous side, many people took it seriously. And interest for the league is unabated, with several people recently asking about it. So I guess there is sufficient demand, and it looks like it could be fun to play with economists. Hence, I want to make a proposal, ask for comments, and let people vote whether such a fantasy league should be run.

Here is the proposal. As the publishing output of economists is rather slow-moving and there is no defined season for play, the league is set up for continuous entry and play is on an infinite horizon. A set of rules has been drafted, and I welcome comments about them, especially from those who are more used to play in this kind of league.

For those who are worried that they could be virtually subject to trades, there would be the ability to opt out from being played with.

Beyond fine-tuning rules, there is also the question whether such a league should be run at all. Below is a poll that will be open for a month. Feel free to vote.


Openness of Economic Data and Code

August 9, 2013

The publication of an article or a working paper is only part of the scientific process. Scrutiny by the scientific community during the peer-review process and later through replication attempts and extensions of the original work should be part of it. Unfortunately, very little of that is happening in economics. Indeed, a significant hurdle is that very often the computer code and/or the data used for the analysis are not disseminated. While some journals now make this a requirement for publication, there is otherwise very little incentive for researchers to make this available. In part, this is also a question of culture, as we are not used to cite datasets, for example, and prefer to acknowledge their use in a footnote.

To change this culture and push for making code and data more readily available, the Open Knowledge Foundation and put together a set of Principles on Open Economics. Read them and sign on if you think you are willing to endorse them.

On the RePEc front, we are working to get datasets indexed as well. If interested in participating in this, contact me.


RePEc in July 2013

August 4, 2013

Some news from NEP: There is a new report, NEP-NPS (Nonprofit and Public Sectors), and a new NEP blog, NEP-ARA (Economics of the Arab World). The NEREUS project announced that is will be closing the Economists Online RePEc service at the end of the year. There are a few newly participating RePEc archives: ToKnowPress, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Universitatea Creştină “Dimitrie Cantemir”, Oklahoma State University, Akadémiai Kiadó, Sciences Po. But despite this small crop, a lot of new material was added to RePEc, 6600 papers and 10500 articles. We counted 470,265 file downloads and 1,939,170 abstract views last month.

The thresholds we reached:
5000000 matched citations
300000 cited articles
3000 indexed software components
400 RePEc-wide H-index


EconomistsOnline closing

July 18, 2013

This guest post was written by Kieron Jones.

The Nereus Steering Committee has reached the decision that Economists Online (EO) should close on 01 January 2014. This follows a period of consultation and discussion, and reflects the portal’s costs of on going maintenance, progress made in content acquisition, preferences of economics research users and usage figures. All EO services will continue to be available and updated for the rest of 2013.

The research made available through the NEEO project and subsequent EO portal will still be accessible via individual repositories and RePEc services. Some of the additional functionality offered by EO can still be retained or made available. For example:


  • The RePEc archive of publications from participating EO partners will cease. However, individual institutions can liaise directly with RePEc if they wish their material to still be available through RePEc services. Instructions are available here.
  • Publication lists for EO researchers will be discontinued. A number of options are available. EO can provide participating institutions with an export of researchers’ lists, institutions may maintain a research publications service or authors may wish to create their own lists using RePEc or Google Scholar.
  • Usage statistics will no longer be available. Options are available for DSpace repositories and through the paid service OA Statistik.
  • With regard to the discontinuation of the Nereus Dataverse Network, institutions can create their own archive in the DVN. Links can then be connected to articles residing in repositories.

If you would like further information, please contact the Economists Online helpdesk.


RePEc in June 2013

July 3, 2013

What is new this month? We introduce two new ranking criteria, breadth of citations for registered authors and strength of students for authors, institutions, and regions. The latter ranking for institutions comes to an evaluation of graduate programs and is based on information provided by users to the RePEc Genealogy.

We welcomed a series of new RePEc archives: Society for the Study of Business and Finance, Xiamen University, University of Belgrade, American University of Sharjah, National School of Political and Administrative Studies, Serbian Association of Economists, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, University fo Amsterdam (III), Lifescience Global, IPAG Business School, Istanbul Bilgi University. We counted 500,656 file downloads and 1,942,807 abstract views. And we passed the following thresholds:

2500000 cumulative abstract views for book chapters
1400000 listed works
250000 JEL-coded working papers
7000 books available online
1000 contributors to the RePEc Genealogy


Little known RePEc features

June 29, 2013

Since 1997, RePEc services have found various ways of disseminating the bibliographic metadata collected with the RePEc projects. As the data and the types of data have expanded over the years, services were able to add more and more features, some of which are not well known. The purpose of this post is to highlight some of them. A broad introduction to RePEc services was recently posted here.

When a bibliographic item or an author is mentioned on Wikipedia with a link to a RePEc service, a link to the Wikpedia article in provided on the relevant IDEAS page.

The same applies to blog posts that have been identified through the EconAcademics.org. blog aggregator for economic research.

A large number of viewership statistics are available at LogEc. This includes statistics for individual papers and articles, authors, series and journals. For the latter, this includes total readership as well as most popular items within a series or journal. For authors, one can also find the most read authors by country.

All RePEc services offer search functions, But if you do not know what to look for, you can look at a random item.

Publishers provide all bibliographic metadata to RePEc. Sometimes, their data contains errors that prevents the publications to be indexed appropriately, if at all. This can be checked here.

On IDEAS, one can export bibliographic information in various formats for various lists: publications of an author, references of an item, citations of an item, and citations of an author.

It possible to track additions to author profiles, JEL code, series, and journals with MyIDEAS.

MyIDEAS also allows users to flag items they run across IDEAS and keep them in their account. They can then be annotated, sorted into folders and exported in various bibliographic formats.

There is a Facebook plug-in that allows you to display you last three publications. Install it from here. Update: I am told this functionality cannot be obtained on Facebook anymore.

One can obtain a compilation of the publications of all members of an institution. Find th link on the institution’s page at EDIRC, where there is also a link to the publication list of the institution’s alumni, if applicable.

You can also create a list of publications for a custom group of people. See the current lists or create your own here.

If you want to make public a reading list for a topic or a course syllabus, you can create this here.

A few editors have started to determine the most important works in their research area. See RePEc Biblio, where you can volunteer to contribute, too.

Economists are very interconnected through co-authorship. You can explore this co-authorship network at CollEc, where you can also find how far removed from each other any two economists are (“degrees of separation”).

An important part of RePEc is citation analysis. Unfortunately, this fails for some documents, either for technical reasons or because publishers do not furnish relevant data. One can help our citation project CitEc through this form.

RePEc tries to match different versions of the same work. The conditions are that 1) at least one co-authors has all versions in her RePEc profile, and 2) the titles are very similar. When the process fails, for example when the titles are different, users can help through this form

Matching citations to items listed in RePEc is a very complex process, for example because there are many citation formats and because authors do make mistakes in the references. When matches are too uncertain, authors can help. They should click on the “citation” link in their RePEc Author Service profile and accept or reject proposed matches.

A new project tracks where and when an economist got his final degree, and who his advisor was. The data collection is crowd-sourced, so you can participate in the data collection here as well. See the RePEc Genealogy. Collected data will soon be used to evaluate graduate programs.

Unfortunately, we have cases of plagiarism. When relevant authorities do not deal with such cases, afflicted authors can turn to the RePEc Plagiarism Committee, which evaluates cases and possibly names and shames them.

And finally, for economics departments and publishers that do not yet participate and index their publications in RePEc, instructions are available.


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