How does RePEc get its data?

April 24, 2012

The RePEc team regularly gets requests to from authors to add this or that item to the database, or enquiries from editors why RePEc is discriminating against their journal by not listing it. It is therefore useful to discuss again how RePEc gathers all its bibliographic data, and thus what various users can do to enhance the listings.

RePEc does not have any data entry staff, one because RePEc has a budget of zero, two because the data entry is done by the respective publishers. The same rules apply to all, whether it is a large commercial publisher with many journals or a small research center with a working paper series: they have to open a local metadata archive with bibliographic information formatted in a way that RePEc services can automatically gather and analyze on a regular basis (usually every night). So far, over 1400 archives have followed the detailed instructions necessary for participation. Authors with institutions that fail to participate in RePEc can still get their work listed, by uploading it with MPRA. They need copyright clearance for this, which is granted by most publishers, according to the list compiled by SHERPA/RoMEO.

Author profiles are also maintained by the authors themselves, by registering at the RePEc Author Service. The citation analysis (CitEc project) also depends on the collaboration of publishers, either by allowing the free download of the full texts or by providing the metadata about references separately.

The extremely decentralized nature of RePEc is what allows to reduce central costs to almost nothing and thus keep RePEc free for all: publishers, authors, and readers. The collected data can then be offered by the various RePEc services, and those bear the (small) cost of massaging the RePEc data to make it useful for everyone.


Aggegating discussion of economics research on blogs

April 10, 2012

The discussion of economic issues on the blogosphere is too little based on actual research. To promote blogs that discuss research, the blog aggregator EconAcademics.org was created a few years ago, showing for a select few blogs their last posts. EconAcademics.org has now been completely redone, with a radical change in concept.

The site now monitors a large number of economics blogs and selects the posts that discuss research. These posts are currently identified by a link to material on EconPapers, IDEAS, or NEP. The selected posts are then displayed on the site (main page and respective language) and linked from the relevant IDEAS page. We hope this will further promote the discussion of economic issues based on research and the blogs that do so.

You can find the new blog aggregator at EconAcademics.org.


RePEc in March 2012

April 5, 2012

The big news this month is the launch of a new RePEc service, CollEc, which analyzes co-authorship networks within RePEc. Data from CollEc is now also integrated in author rankings. Furthermore, IDEAS now links back to any Wikipedia article mentioning a RePEc page (details). And the RePEc home page was redesigned. Watch this space, more initiatives are on the way.

We counted 684,729 file downloads and 2,385,381 abstract views through reporting RePEc services. We also welcomed the following new participating RePEc archives: Cornell University (II), Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI), ISTIEE, Universidade de Vigo, Kammer für Arbeiter und Angestellte für Wien, and Okan Üniversitesi.

Finally, we passed the following thresholds:
150000000 cumulative working paper abstract views
300000 JEL coded items
40000 registered people


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